marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

Dreamwidth was unintentionally DDosed by someone's homework a few weeks ago. And no, you can't make this stuff up: Tonight's intermittent 404's.

While I was busy being mostly unable to use the site (along with [personal profile] conuly, whom I was having a comment exchange on this DW with at the same moment said homework went on a rampage) I hit upon a few DW pages that thanks to our CDN (CloudFlare) had been converted on-the-fly into read-only, which lets us view the site without actually being able to use it.

Fascinated, I studied the read-onlyness of them while exchanging replies with someone on an Anti-AOL post about AOL shutting off their News comment sections, which occurred approximately eleventy bajillion years ago but somehow is still news. The person replying was in a pique that comments to that post were less than, shall we say, civil.

For her, this included comments from my commenters (who think my blog is officially sponsored and run by AOL, and who therefore address the blog owner - that is, me - as though I'm not only an AOL employee, but also like I'm The Reason Why They Can't Have Nice Things) and comments from me, because I don't enjoy people still thinking I work for AOL after telling them a thousand times a second that no, I don't.

After exchanging a few comments with her (she was actually rather nice, which I appreciated) I looked back at DW's Support page, which I was also trying to reach while it was set to read-only, so thanks specifically to DW's homework DDoS Anti-AOL is now (permanently) read-only, because while I was waiting for DW to get un-DDoSed I shut comments off, just like they did over at AOL News.

If you're a Wordpress.com blog owner who wants to completely disable comments, it's not that hard, just time-consuming. Step 1: Log in, go to WP admin and disable comments. Step 2: Screen all publicly visible comments - that's it. It took a while because WP.com's admin is 1983 dial-up slow and you can only screen one pageful of comments at a time.

The way I did it (I'm not sure if there's a sorting option or if having one might help) newest comments screen first, which gave me a nice, chill walk down memory lane back to when Anti-AOL was on LJ and nearly no one thought I worked for AOL and sometimes I miss the hell out of just being thought of as myself but oh well, the blog will be 12 years old this November and I stopped having anything constructive to say about AOL years ago.

marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

Firefox actually has the weirdest performance in some areas:

  • clearing comment forms on entry pages (the whitespace between entry and form works as it should in _every_other_browser_; in Firefox the form doesn't clear by more than a few pixels unless I about triple the top margin).
  • arranging cell space on comment forms under 360px width on mobile is not going very well (our comment forms are actually tables nested within tables, which doesn't make it any easier)
  • displaying padding in text fields (for example, the search box in the navigation bar above the header is the wrong shape/size in _every_other_browser_ because Firefox)
  • certain CSS properties/values work in Firefox but in no other browser, which led to this thing today where my comment forms looked like someone shook all my pages really hard and let the form fields land where they would. Such fun.

I think I'd need about a thousand hacks for every possible browser/OS/device configuration to work around some of this, or to simply hack Firefox to allow better display in other browsers. And I could hack Firefox, because there are hacks for it.

The other thing is how needless it is to test page display on multiple versions of modern Webkit (only speaking of Windows browsers). If you check a web page in Chromium or Google Chrome, it seems you've checked it in every modern Webkit browser including Safari for Windows - which stopped at v.5 some years ago - except modern (non-Presto) Opera, which has its own ideas about CSS.

I'm not sure if this applies to Chrome on Android, as well, but as far as desktop testing goes, yeah, it does seem that way.

marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

I do actually have a Support Request in over this. From the tl:dr: at the end of it:

"the Upload Images page should have uploaded images set to the same security as one's journal is by default, which should match the security shown on the Manage Images page, but because the upload page defaults to "public" on the dropdown, the last 3-5 images I've uploaded from DW and posted publicly, both to Support Staff and on my own DW were locked to access-only and I didn't know it, since I haven't viewed any of these pages while logged out of DW."

ETA: I closed the original Support Request and opened another after getting feedback in the comments below saying that the first request was not worded clearly enough.

All pictures I think I've set to public should now be public at this point, as I just went through my last few weeks of image uploads to make sure. My apologies to anyone who was like, "Huh" and just stopped reading because there was no image to carry the point(s) I was trying to make in whatever post(s) you came across in this condition.

Now y'all have learned I don't look at my own DW logged-out often enough to catch these things, which is maybe not the greatest fact to share with whoever runs across this, but anyhow...

marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

...what? *side eyes Issue 2119 (from related code tour)*

Actually happened. To me. At the time, though, that was *not* what I thought had uh, happened *winces*. And no, reading through the pull request, I see I'm not the only person who's been bit by this bug (following it back to the original is actually pretty interesting, as the bug responsible for it was alive and kicking 16 years ago).

marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

In looking through support requests tonight I ran across [personal profile] steve98052, which turns out to be pretty neat, because after five minutes of staring at his username I finally recalled we used to hang out on LJ. Thanks to the nature of his support request, I initially thought he was importing his LJ (but he hasn't, and to judge by things, probably won't be anytime soon) but I clicked through to make sure, only to see an empty DW.

Then I looked him up on LJ, where in fact he's still updating.

Then I checked his friends list, because it's been bugging me for weeks that I had a friend on LJ who's username I can't recall (well, half of it: I can recall half of it, but that hasn't helped) who doesn't seem to be here or there now, but once I saw Steve's name, it occurred to me I think I shared (might have even met this friend) through him. Her and wuchan (also gone) were my closest friends on LJ, and sometimes (OK, I've spent six years in this condition) I miss not having them here.

But this all went nowhere fast. Turns out, checking Steve's friend list, that I probably met him through [profile] bob_deloyd, but other than that, this was sort of just a half hour of me chasing my tail. Oh, well.

Steve's support request is interesting, though, and I'm sorry it didn't/probably won't get much attention, because his request (to find a link rewriter in the importer to point internal LJ links to corresponding internal DW links, or to write the code to do so himself, then give the code to DW!) is much needed and HE'S OFFERING TO WRITE THE FEATURE HIMSELF so why aren't we welcoming volunteer baby devs like this with open arms? It seems not having this feature might be stopping him from moving here, which is really not cool.

(Not to mention I could have SO used this feature before my own import occurred in 2010 - I had to rewrite dozens, if not hundreds, of links over the years, post by post, totally and completely by hand, with all the attendant time waste and errors that involves. It sucked.)

Not that he needs the defense, but he's a Silicon Valley (and/or) Redmond WA guy, and is pretty cool all around....which makes me think Dreamwidth can be totally at odds with what I would expect them to want to do, sometimes.

marahmarie: my initials (MM) (Default)

ETA, 4-23-17: Swapped to gendered pronouns upon request, clarified [personal profile] solarbird's changes to the navbar were live CSS edits, not "mock-ups", fixed broken navbar section for Firefox on Mac (for all changes please see comments).


So except for mostly minor "fix it as we go along" stuff, I've not seriously updated my CSS in over a year, which I know because the last time I went through my code I didn't live here. :)

Though I've wrangled with the idea of switching up the layout, I've adapted Craigslist's attitude of, "If it's not broke, don't fix it" along with, "Anything we want can be added, so why change the whole damn thing", which means yes, this page will probably remain in the aughts forever, because Craigslist is right.

In the meantime I was busy never editing my CSS again when I ran across a new suggestion for adding a drop-down to the top navbar's Inbox, which by itself didn't cause me to edit or change anything. But then [personal profile] solarbird, the suggestion author, began talking about changing the top navbar in general, pointing out what I'd been too kind to mention when I commented: that it needs to get hit by a car a serious update for modern, non-table-based times (it's all tables. Tables, tables and tables. All taaaaabbbbbbllllles. Even those of us who come from LJ (all tables, until Russia took over) can have a hard time with tables. I learned to make web pages one way: in CSS. Not tables).

After mentioning she'd love for the text to at least align on it (simple enough, right? Y'all wouldn't believe how hard it is) I gave her most of my navbar code, which was nothing and looked something like this, which is from a much older style sheet.

Of course, I can't share my code without wondering what inspired me, because I hate everything I code, so I started picking my navbar CSS apart based on some of the things [personal profile] solarbird wanted, then compared what I had to what she later posted pictures of after adding the CSS to her DW. The code knocked mine clean out of the water, so then I guess I had to make a better navbar - if only for myself - because I'm not going to admit I'm kind of competitive, because I'm totally, absolutely not anything like that and anyone who thinks so is delusional.

Comment exchange went on as Denise more or less tried to hire [personal profile] solarbird right from the web page (she's a designer, from what I gather) before I decided to tear my navbar code apart and re-write it; hopefully the end result is better than what it was. It wraps on mobile based on back-end code put in place by DW; while I'm not happy with the wrap (it collapses to one column while there's still room for two; I keep my wrapping parameters somewhat tighter) it's relatively fail-safe, which is why I don't change it.

So I kept a few lines of my original navbar edits and just started over: even my last update to [personal profile] solarbird is obsolete because like anything else, I'll edit until I just can't stand to anymore.

Now what we have is:

  • new navbar background
  • better navbar text alignment
  • navbar font-size increase
  • navbar "search for interests" text field (it needs a label - some forgotten code elsewhere in my style sheet had kept this text field hidden altogether)

Additionally...

The navbar, though you wouldn't know it, has three sections: 1) user/user links, 2) name of journal you're viewing/related links, 3) interest search and reload page: light|original. While my thought was to spread those sections out more evenly, there's too much whitespace, so I simply spread them out more than they were.

Parallax scrolling: I've wanted it forever so now I have it - but only in (logged-in view) Firefox; in Webkit/Edge/IE and logged-out Fx it falls over (or, more precisely, falls under the header about 10-15px, where it stays until it goes away altogether on smaller mobile views) so after hours of fiddling, finally I was like "the heck with it" and set three views for the navbar. Yes, three, all at once:

In logged-in Firefox it's set to parallax (position:fixed); in Webkit/logged-out Fx it's sticky (position:sticky - still in experimental W3C status) and in IE10/11/Edge it's set to normal (position:relative). Parallax *almost* works in Edge, except same as Webkit/logged-out FX, I can't get the navbar to stay behind the header until your first downward scroll completes.

Since I was in the CSS editor, anyhow, I fixed maybe half a dozen funky little things - like the username and usericon on edit comment forms floating around in the middle of them like, "Huh? Where am I?" That's been an issue for years, and for some reason it was finally starting to drive me nuts.