conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
(again)

You know, I've been going back and forth on how bad I feel about the way we got Finn. Right now I'm firmly back on the "not bad at all" side, because apparently the kids told her that he got out while they were bringing in groceries, and instead of catching him or chasing him (and as an older dog, he just doesn't move that fast, even when people do bother to trim his toenails so they aren't digging into his feet!) they decided to finish with the groceries first. This task must've taken quite a while, because it was a good 45 minutes between Finn arriving at our door and them arriving at our door to ask if we'd seen him.

Honestly, it seems this is the bare minimum of responsible dog ownership. Just a day or two ago, I caught somebody's dog for them. The dog bounded into my arms, and I held her still as the owner trotted up. That woman had chased after her dog for three blocks! But they couldn't bother to get their not-very-fast dog before they brought in the potatoes? Potatoes don't go anywhere!

One thing I didn't appreciate before:

Apr. 27th, 2017 04:21 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Dogs can really streamline my after dinner clean-up. I've long since been in the habit of tossing meat scraps at any cats lucky enough to be in my vicinity as I put away dinner, but now I have furry disposals for veggie scraps as well. (Yes, I know, dogs - especially small dogs! - should only have a small amount of human food. But I don't think a few bites of plain boiled potato is going to kill them. I google everything before I let any animal near it, and anyway, if it's more than a few bites I put it away in the fridge.)

Finn, thus far, has proven himself quite enthusiastic about plain boiled potatoes, tomatoes (only in tiny quantities, which means I now have to hide my tomatoes away), green beans, and sweet potato. Moonpie is enthusiastic about... dog treats. Sometimes. Well, there's no accounting for taste!

We want to get Finn fattened up so he can have his surgery, so anything healthy that he's eager to eat, we're happy to give him.

(no subject)

Apr. 27th, 2017 12:29 pm
twistedchick: General Leia in The Force Awakens (Default)
[personal profile] twistedchick
It's weird. I know that a lot of it is the effect of the prednisone on emotional balance -- it's either euphoria or the opposite, and at this point it's the good stuff -- but it feels as if the cosmic timing is working. Most of the time, what needs to happen, happens; the people I need to contact are there; stuff is working. And it feels good when that's going on. I'm not plowing uphill against inner resistance.

Doesn't mean I won't be doing that in a couple of weeks or so. I'm giving notice now that I expect to be more than a bit bitchy toward the end of June. But that's a while away. And it might not be as bad as last year, when I had no notion what to expect.

Still waking up absurdly early -- I haven't been awake that far before dawn since elementary school days, when I had to be outside, fed and washed and clothed and waiting for the school bus before 7:30, or when I did factory work and had to get up at 4:30 to drive 20 miles to do a 9-hour shift, get home and fall in bed exhausted at 7:30 p. m. Still, waking up before the birds is weird. I am used to them waking me; I listen for them, for which ones are calling when. Can't identify them all, but some are familiar. Wake up early enough, and the Beltway is nearly silent -- which really only happens during snowstorms or ice storms. Who knew it happened at 2 a.m. also? No trucks cranking their gearshifts and brakes on the turns, grinding gears so the sound bounces off the barriers and over the top.
theferrett: (Meazel)
[personal profile] theferrett

So I’d hoped the Republicans would grow up after being trounced in their first attempt at repealing/replacing Obamacare.  I’d legitimately love it if Republicans said, “People are being bankrupted by out-of-control health costs, and health care is complicated – why don’t we take some time to get the law right and come up with something America doesn’t hate?”

Instead, natch, they’re trying to ram through a hasty bill that’s even worse than the last one.  They may vote as early tomorrow.

Which is why you have to call your Representatives now.  And here’s how you stop do that:

CALL, DO NOT EMAIL.
Politicians can ignore emails the way you do. They can’t ignore calls. Their staffers have to take the calls, which means their staff doesn’t get anything done while they’re handling calls, which means the Senator is far more likely to hear about how the office is slowing to a crawl because the ACA issue is jamming the lines.

Last time, my super-conservative rep changed his mind on the repeal/replace from “YEAH LET’S DO IT” to “Uh, maybe?” because the calls were literally running 20 to 1 in favor of keeping Obamacare around.

SAY YOU’RE A VOTER FROM YOUR TOWN.
Let them know you’re local. Don’t bother calling if you’re not a potential voter. You do not have to give your name, though you can if you want; they may ask you for your zip code.  You may wish to force them to take your name to ensure they got your message.

HAVE A SCRIPT READY, IF YOU’RE SOCIALLY AWKWARD LIKE ME.
A good script is something like:

1) I’m disappointed that there’s a rush to shove through even worse health care legislation;
2) Please do not repeal the ACA without a strong replacement;
3) If you have a preexisting condition or the ACA has helped your life in some way, talk about that and make it personal how your life (or the life of someone you love) depends on this;
4) I will not vote for any Representative who helps repeal the ACA without a strong replacement, either in the primary or the general election.

You’re free to go on, if you like, but be polite. They kind of have to listen. In my experience, they’ll generally say they’ll pass the message onto the Representative, and hang up. But if you want to be that person who the office groans when they have to handle them – that polite-but-firm person who will be heard – then hey! You can contribute to the office gossip that people are really concerned about this ACA issue, which is good in politics.

CALL YOUR REPRESENTATIVE, NOT YOUR SENATOR.
That means you have to make a maximum of one call, which will take ten minutes max. (Unless your Representative’s line is already clogged, in which case, keep calling.)

You can generally look up your senator by using Who Is My Representative, but if not you’ll find a phone number on their website. Calling the local number is generally viewed to be slightly better.

And here’s the trick: If you’re a conservative who’s opposed to mandating that insurers must be able to insure people with preexisting conditions (for some weird reason), flip the script and call as well. This is a republic, and you deserve to have your voice heard.

That said, there was a ridiculous idea last time that the ACA repeal only failed because it wasn’t conservative enough.  That wasn’t true.  The reason it failed was most because tacking to the right to appeal to the hard-core conservatives cost them more votes in the center, and trying to appeal to everyone made their base splinter.

So calling to register your complaint actually does work.  We’re not guaranteed, of course; the Republicans are desperate, trying to shove through a law they wrote in less than a month that nobody’s even fully read (as opposed to the ACA, which was introduced in July 2009 and voted on in March 2010 after heavy debate).  They may manage it.

But if they do manage to replace the ACA with something that literally punishes those with preexisting conditions (and that could easily be you, even if you’re healthy now!), let it not be because you didn’t try.  Make the call today.

Cross-posted from Ferrett's Real Blog.

daf bit: Bava Batra 95

Apr. 27th, 2017 09:01 am
cellio: (talmud)
[personal profile] cellio

A mishna (a couple pages back) taught: if one sells fruit to another, the buyer must accept a certain amount of refuse (a quarter of a kab for every se'ah; I think this is about 10%). If he sold figs, the buyer must accept ten wormy ones for every hundred, and if he sold a cellar of wine the buyer must accept ten pungent casks for every hundred. On today's daf the g'mara discusses the wine cellar -- what case is this? If it is when the seller says "I sell you a cellar of wine" we have a problem, and if it is when he says "I sell you this cellar of wine", we also have a problem. According to a baraita (an oral teaching contemporary with the mishna), if he says "a cellar", he must sell a cellar all of which is good (since the seller gets to choose the cellar). If he said "this cellar" it means the identified cellar, even if all the wine is bad. Either way, it doesn't match our mishna -- so now what? After discussion, I think the g'mara concludes that the baraita is talking about a case where they specified wine "for a dish", meaning good wine that will be used over time (and so has to last a while), while the mishna is just talking about the ordinary case of buying a lot of wine, some of which -- like fruit -- you know is not going to be good. (But it's a little hard to follow and you should consult your rabbi before buying or selling a wine cellar.) (93b mishna, 95a-b g'mara)